Getting used to Thai Food

One of the struggles with teaching—or simply, living—in a foreign country is getting used to eating their food on a daily basis; a problem that a lot of people face since they aren’t used to going out of their comfort zone. Lucky for me my tongue never gets tired of trying different cuisines. It’s a good thing that Thai food is influenced by many countries like China and Portugal, which makes my job as an ESL teacher in Thailand perfect—for me and my taste buds.

Since arriving in the country, I used up all of my spare time exploring the different towns and cities, learning recipes, overspending on spices and constantly searching for the perfect Pad Thai. I rarely even have time to just lie down and relax because I love teaching and at the same time, I also get too excited to go out and eat something that I have never tried before.

What I love most about Thai food is that every dish is an explosion of flavor and that most of their dishes are showered with just the right amount of spices, so no dish would have to be too bland or too strong.

So far, my favourite Thai dishes are Tom Yum Goong, Yam Nua, Gai Pad Med Ma Muang and of course, the famous Pad Thai. Tom Yum Goong is a classic Thai soup with shrimps or prawns, mushrooms, lemongrass, chilli, galangal, lime leaves, shallots, lime juice & fish sauce while Yam Nua is actually just spicy beef salad with a mix of onions, coriander, spearmint, lime & dried chilli. On the other hand, Gai Pad Med Ma Muang Him Ma Paan, also known as Gai Pad Med Ma Muang is made with stir-fried chicken, cashew nuts, scallions, sweet soy sauce, honey garlic and some good ol’ chilli while Pad Thai or Phat Thai—or as I would like to call it, my best friend and the most popular Thai dish ever invented—is a stir-fried rice noodle dish usually served as street food with crunchy beansprouts, onions, eggs, sugar, tofu, tamarind, vinegar, fish sauce, chilli powder and finely ground peanuts.

What I love most about Thai food is that every dish is an explosion of flavor and that most of their dishes are showered with just the right amount of spices, so no dish would have to be too bland or too strong. According to renowned celebrity chef McDang in his book The Principles of Thai Cookery, Thais do not only pay attention to how a dish tastes, they are also concerned with how it looks, smells, and how it fits in with the rest of the meal—I’m guessing that’s the reason behind the popularity of Thai food around the globe.

Teach to Travel